Help Willow Run Regain the Rosie the Riveter Guinness World Record

by kendra on September 26, 2015

Willow Run Rosies at a recent event.

Willow Run and the Yankee Air Museum in Ypsilanti Township, MI, congratulate the Rockin’ Rosies of Richmond (CA) for beating their original record of 776 Rosies by bringing together 1084 Rosies in August 2015.

But records are made to be broken, and the Rosies of Michigan are determined to reclaim the title for Willow Run. And you can help! Willow Run hopes to gather 2000 Rosies…in one place…at one time.

By registering, dressing the part and showing up, you can help make this a win to remember.

What You Need to Know to Participate

The place to be on October 24, 2015 is Willow Run Airport Hangar One. The staging call to gather will be at 1:30 PM. You can find the online registration form, costume guidelines, waiver form, directions to Airport Hangar One, and the event schedule by going to savethebomberplant.org (just click the link).

Willow Run and the nearby Yankee Air Museum plan to make this event a fun outing. There will be costume judging, prizes, and a lot of picture taking. Plus you’ll have a piece of Guinness World Record bragging rights.

The costume guidelines, while easy to meet, are specific. Yankee Air Museum will be selling some of the accessories you need. And you can always visit our Rosie Legacy Gear shop on ETSY. We have bandanas, Rosie Employment Badge Collar Pins, little bags of rivets, and our Rosie DIY Legacy Portrait Kit includes a We Can Do It! poster and ration book.

Help Save the Bomber Plant

While the Yankee Air Museum and Willow Run enjoy putting on fun events, a lot of the money they raise goes to an important historical landmark. They have been working for the last several years to raise enough money to save the Willow Run Factory where some 40,000 workers built more 8,600 B-24 Liberator bombers. These planes played an important part in winning World War II.

The United States has many monuments to the men and women who served in the military, but we have very few testaments to the dedicated work millions of people on the home front did to supply the war effort. This bomber plant is one of those sites. The factory building has been saved from demolition. Now they’re working to fill the space with exhibits and develop programs for adults and children.

So join hundreds (indeed thousands) of Rosies on October 24, 2015 to set a new Guinness World Record.

Help Willow Run Regain the Rosie the Riveter Guinness World Record

Help Willow Run Regain the Rosie the Riveter Guinness World Record

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Aunt Mary as Rosie the Riveter: Portrait of Courage and Strength by Donna Donabella

by Matilda Butler on July 5, 2015

Post #68 - Rosie’s Daughters: The “First Woman To” Generation Tells Its Story by Matilda Butler and Kendra Bonnett

[NOTE: Over the coming months, we'll be sharing some of the intriguing stories we received from readers--stories that honor Rosie the Riveters, women who worked during World War II. Today, we're posting Donna Donabella's vignette about her Aunt Mary. Yes, it is a story about hardship during the war, but it is a much larger story of an incredible woman who did what needed to be done.]

Portrait of Courage and Strength

by Donna Donabella

It was December 7, 1941 and the horror of the attack on Pearl Harbor was fresh and raw.  Mary Rose Parise had taken a Civil Service Exam to work for the government weeks earlier, and now on this horrific day was being offered a job at the Navy Yard.  Although it was a great opportunity she declined the job. After all the war wasn’t going to last more than a year, now that the United States was involved.  Instead she decided the job at Sears, for $12 a week, was a better opportunity.

And as the sole breadwinner in her family of four, better opportunities were most important to Mary. Her mother had died 6 years earlier, when Mary was 13, leaving her to care for her two sisters, Theresa, 10 and Emma, 3. Her father had worked, but was recently injured in a fall. Unable to work anymore, they were relying on his social security check of $25 a month and anything Mary could earn. So naturally she took the better job, the one that would not disappear in a year once the war was over.
 
And Mary was convinced it would be over quickly.

[Photo: Aunt Mary, age 13, and her two sisters.] The Parise family had emigrated from Italy to their new country in 1923 when Mary was one. She was not the oldest, but was the oldest surviving child when they arrived. Her parents’ house had no heat except for one lone stove in the middle of the small center room. Of the five children born to the family, only three would live beyond their first few years. So Mary was used to hardship when her mother died in 1935. It was second nature for this lanky young girl to go to school, and then come home and take care of the family. She had little time to mourn as she was now the female head of the household.  And when Mary graduated from vocational school at 18, she had to find work to support the family.

By May of 1942, as the country realized that this war was not going to be over any time soon, Mary wanted to work for the war effort. It was a risk to leave her reliable job, but one she was willing to take to do her little part. Mary luckily landed a job with the Signal Corps at the supply depot in Philadelphia. The Signal Corps was established in 1860, and became one of the technical services in the Army Service Forces during WWII responsible for establishing and maintaining communications.

Every day this young woman, of medium height and medium strength, showed up to work in one of the few clean, pressed dresses she owned, her curly brown hair falling around her shoulders. Her gentle brown eyes and intoxicating smile welcomed her co-workers who she described as, “Nice people to work with.” She quickly worked her way up from a typist to the job of expeditor. On the surface, the job seemed menial in its description. You took a requisition for supplies and filled it with great speed and efficiency. What could be simpler? But this job was far from simple.

Mary enjoyed the job because as she says, “You got to do lots of walking. It was different than just sitting and typing all day. You used your mind and problem solved. It was very challenging.” Mary was well respected in her job as she was given what were called the “hot requisitions.” These were especially important because our troops were without the supplies needed on the front lines in both the European and Pacific Theaters.

Mary would take the “hot requisition” and walk it through all the departments until it got to shipping. Sometimes this meant she had to stay past her shift. Each of these orders were of utmost importance After all, our boys were counting on the efforts of those back in the States. If stock control or inventory did not have the materials needed, an officer would accompany Mary to other areas of the depot to conduct a search as supplies would sometimes be mislabeled or tucked away in the wrong spot. Or she would go to the girls in purchasing to find materials in other areas of the country. Occasionally if Mary couldn’t find what was needed, she would have to call the manufacturer to try and order supplies, but that was a last resort. Often times Mary had to find a substitute that would do for now, and that took quick thinking on her part.

Mary recounted times that officers from the field would arrive with requisitions that she would have to fill fast. She would walk the requisition through with the officers to ensure the materials were quickly dispatched. She felt good about her job saying, “I felt like I was doing something to help. It felt good because the front lines were getting things they needed, and I was proud to help them.”

Mary and others were required to rotate and work all 3 shifts in the office, each shift just as busy as the other. This was not your typical office either, but a large building filled with rows of desks, clacking typewriters, Xerox machines humming loudly, phones ringing non-stop and thousands of people talking–and that was just in her section. The noise was deafening so it was a relief when Mary could spend time in the other areas and buildings searching for the right supplies to fill the orders needed during the war.

Mary was usually exhausted when she left work. She would often arrive home to chores that were still waiting for her.  After all someone had to do the washing and ironing, even the dishes. Her father was a help with some housework and cooking, but that help was limited. Her sisters were expected to go to school, and do their homework with just some light chores. Much was left to Mary. Frequently Mary would decline her co-workers efforts to get her to go out after work.  But sometimes she went to South Philly on the bus to get a slice of pizza before she worked the midnight shift.  There were times she went to dinner at a girlfriend’s house or even out for Chinese food, but those were rare excursions to help deal with the work-a-day stress.

Most nights Mary took the long ride home by herself–a ride that required both the bus and trolley. When she worked the later 4-12 or 12-8 shifts she would get an escort from a policeman who would drive alongside her as she walked from the bus stop to her house. Sometimes Mary was so exhausted after the last shift that she would fall asleep on the trolley as she rode it to the end of the line in complete oblivion. She would then have to ride it all the way back to get home, much later then she expected, even more tired after her cat nap. It is no wonder she really disliked the late shifts.

Mary worked as an expeditor until the war ended. She made little more than $1600 a year working full time during the war. This would equate to $20,464 today. Mary wanted to continue to work in her job after the war, but she was told women couldn’t have these jobs, and not because men were returning home to these particular jobs.  Simply put, men did these jobs not women.

Aunt Mary is my mother\'s Maid of Honor in 1953[Photo: Aunt Mary as my mother's Maid of Honor, 1954.] But Mary never questioned these decisions. Instead she moved on to find another job after taking another test. Mary held various civil service jobs throughout her working career always trying to advance and passing any test given to her. Many times she said, “I don’t know how I passed all those tests.” Because Mary had a war services appointment, after the war she was able to transfer to the Veteran’s Administration where she helped veterans complete forms she created so they could go back to school on the GI Bill. Mary moved on to work for the City Health Department where she helped in clinics and dispensed medications to families. She eventually returned to clerical work for businesses and the government before retiring.

Aunt Mary in her 80s[Photo: Aunt Mary in her 80s.] At this writing, Mary (Parise) Esposito is still alive at the young age of 90.  She is spry, and will turn 91 in March.   Mary is my aunt and she raised my mother, Emma, her baby sister.  And although her hair is white and she walks with a cane, she has not lost the sparkle in those kind eyes.

As she grew older and her sisters left and married, Mary took care of her father until his death. When he died, she was 34 and unmarried.  She did marry Hugo Esposito soon after her father’s death, but had no children. Her sisters, nieces and nephews were her children, and she was like a mother or grandmother to us.

My aunt has great humility, and always celebrates the other person’s accomplishments with pride downplaying anything she does. As I was growing up, Aunt Mary appeared to know everyone, and if she didn’t, she smiled and talked with them as if she did. She never missed a chance to visit friends or pay her respects to everyone she knew–touching them with just her smile, her kind words. These are the most important things to her.  The way she has lived her whole life not looking for anyone to reciprocate.  Just treating people the way we all should with friendship, respect and love.

And now she lives with my mom in Arizona. She still knows everyone, and what is going on in their lives. Who is sick or hurt. Who may need some help or a friend to visit. She still pays her respects and welcomes friends and neighbors into her home.

Aunt Mary has been an incredible role model for me.  And as time is blurred and I find myself back in the early days of WWII, I can see Mary lending an ear or a shoulder. Knowing all the people who worked with her soldiers and civilians alike. In her mind, she’s not a Rosie the Riveter, but just a humble woman never letting on what burdens she had–instead helping those around her bear their burdens.

Aunt Mary, a true portrait of courage and strength for women throughout the ages.


Donna Donabella recently retired from a 35-year career in education. She currently is pursuing a career as a writer and poet. She is married to her soul mate, Robert, who is her champion. Donna is an avid gardener, and blogs about her life and gardening at gardenseyeview.com. And you can read her poetry and prose at her new blog www.livingfromhappiness.com, where she is inspired by change, challenge and creativity.

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A Rosie the Riveter Story Told by Sara Etgen-Baker

by Matilda Butler on May 3, 2015

Post #67 - Rosie’s Daughters: The “First Woman To” Generation Tells Its Story by Matilda Butler and Kendra Bonnett

[NOTE: Over the coming months, we'll be sharing some of the fabulous stories we received--stories that honor Rosie the Riveters, women who worked during World War II. Today, we're posting Sara Etgen-Baker's vignette.]

I’LL BE SEEING YOU

by Sara Etgen-Baker*

“Ladies and Gentlemen,” announced the captain, “in approximately five minutes, we will begin our descent into Liberal Mid-America Regional Airport where the weather is slightly windy and 78 degrees. At this time make sure your trays are clear and in their upright position. Please fasten your seat belts and remain in your seats until we are safely at the arrival gate. Thank you for flying with us today.”

Just as I fastened my seat belt, the plane tilted slightly to the left and began a slow, steady turn. I looked out my window; the ground below looked like square plots on a huge map of some kind. Gradually, the Kansas prairie came into view with its wheat fields waving as if to welcome me home. As the plane neared the ground, small cars heading down long highways of black ribbon appeared, as well as homes of different sizes and shapes.

Then a sudden bump—I jumped slightly as the landing gear was released. Trees and rooftops whizzed by as the aircraft made its final turn toward the waiting runway and ended with a mild rumbling as the tires kissed the tarmac. Once the plane taxied to a halt, I was the only passenger who walked through the fuselage door onto the jetway bridge disembarking into the airport.

AAF Classrooms, circa 1943

AAF Classrooms, circa 1943

Once inside the airport, I found it virtually empty—still with anticipation and a tinge of sadness in the air. As I made my way toward baggage claim, the floor beneath my feet creaked with the voices of the pilots and soldiers who once worked at this airfield during World War II. I glanced out the huge plate-glass windows and spotted the deserted AAF classroom buildings, abandoned hanger, and empty storage facilities. I fought back the tears wondering, Why did I expect this place to remain the same when nothing else does?

At baggage claim the skycap handed me my luggage. “If you hurry, you can catch the cabbie before he leaves for town.”

I scurried through the lobby toward the automatic sliding doors, stepped outside, and stood at the crosswalk waiting until the cab appeared. “Let me help you with your luggage, ma’am.” I watched as the young cabbie easily lifted my two large suitcases into the trunk of his vehicle. He opened the backdoor on the passenger side and said, “My name’s Tom. Where ya headed today?”

“I’m heading into town….734 North Webster Avenue. Do you know where that is?”

“Certainly do, ma’am.” Tell me…,” he paused, “are you from around here or just visitin’?”

“Both. I grew up in Liberal. During the war I worked as a clerk at the Liberal Army Airfield. Then when my parents moved to Missouri in 1943, I moved into my Uncle Claude’s house on North Webster Avenue. He recently passed away so I’m here for his funeral.”

I looked out the window as the cabbie turned onto 8th Street heading west past the fairgrounds and Bluebonnet Park. The cabbie turned right onto North Webster and said, “Here we are ma’am…734 North Webster Avenue. I’ll pull into the driveway.”

Before getting out of the cab, I stared at the vacant, old house not knowing what to expect. Although it looked familiar, the paint was weathered and peeling off in spots; the slats in the shutters on the upstairs windows were mostly broken out. A slight breeze made the shutters tap against the house, and the hinges squeaked. Despite ivy clinging to the outer walls of the house, I could see inside the front door into the house past the banister and stairway that led upstairs.

“From those second story windows, I watched as the airport, hangars, and runways were constructed. From there I also watched the military parade march through downtown Liberal the day many of the soldiers and pilots arrived at the airfield for their training.”

“A parade during war time must have been moving,” he commented.

“Yes, it was, Tom. Those parades kept us all—civilians and military—motivated and focused on the war effort. That parade convinced me that I somehow needed to join in the war effort.”

“So, what did you decide to do?” he asked.

“I took a job working as a clerk at the new airfield. When not working, I tended to our Victory Garden.” I pointed to the vine-covered backyard. “As a matter of fact, my Aunt Jean and I planted it back there.”

“A Victory Garden?” he raised an inquisitive eyebrow. “What was that?”

“Because sacrifice was part of the war effort, the government rationed foods like sugar, butter, milk, cheese, eggs, coffee, meat, and canned goods. Like many other women, we planted a garden so we’d have our own fruits and vegetables. At some point we canned our fruits and vegetables leaving commercial canned goods for the troops. Later, I built nest boxes for eggs and raised chickens just so we’d have eggs for eating and cooking.”

“Must’ve been hard to make those sacrifices,” he said.

“Like most Americans I didn’t feel like I was making a sacrifice at all. I felt patriotic doing my part—however small—to insure America’s victory.” I opened the car door. “Tom, would you mind waiting for me while I go inside?”

“Sure thing, ma’am. I’ll wait as long as you need me to. Take your time.”

I stepped onto the gravel driveway and gingerly climbed the rickety steps onto the porch. Using my antique skeleton key, I turned the rusty lock and opened the front door fully expecting Uncle Claude and Aunt Jean to greet me. As I entered the house, the sun—now low in the sky—illuminated the downstairs rooms.

Although the old house was decaying, the floors inside were not rotten and looked sturdy enough to bear my weight. As I walked through the entryway, I found the grandfather clock had long since stopped. I closed my eyes and imaged myself in another time altogether when blackout curtains hung over the windows and I sat in the living room listening to radio shows like “Amos ‘n Andy,” “Bing Crosby,” and “The Green Hornet.” I even thought I heard the old phonograph playing songs from big band leaders like Duke Ellington and Glenn Miller.

I opened my eyes and discovered the chandelier that once shone upon the piano was now covered in cobwebs and dust. I headed toward the kitchen, looked back and caught a glimpse of Aunt Jean—her hands dancing across the keyboard—playing her favorite wartime song, “I’ll Be Seeing You.” The buffet and china cabinet were just as she’d left them; but mold from damp nights had seeped into the walls making gray streaks across my aunt’s favorite wallpaper. In the kitchen I found an empty teakettle sitting on the stove patiently waiting for Aunt Jean’s return.

Ribbons of moonlight drifted through the kitchen window and shimmered across the kitchen table where I often drank coffee and talked with Uncle Claude about the war. At this table, my future husband—a mechanic on the flight line—asked Uncle Claude for my hand in marriage. Despite the war, the old house was alive and always full of people—a sort of wartime oasis for soldiers, pilots, and locals that my uncle invited to his home.

Now, though, the old house—hallow and lifeless—echoed with memories. Although the night was new, darkness soon forced me to say goodbye to the old house. So I walked through the moonlight down the driveway turning back as though summoned and drinking in the sights—relishing the flood of memories. I stared up at the moon. Then something caught my eye. On the second floor, the curtain moved; and I saw the woman I used to be—an innocent, patriotic wartime bride full of hope and anticipation about her future.

Just as we pulled out of the driveway, I thought heard my aunt playing her piano and singing her favorite song to me:





“I’ll be seeing you in all the old familiar places that this heart of mine embraces all day through. In that small café, the park across the way, the children’s carousel, the chestnut tree, the wishing well.

I’ll be seeing you in every lovely, summer’s day; and everything that’s bright and gay; I’ll always think of you that way. I’ll find you in the morning sun; and when the night is new, I’ll be looking at the moon, but I’ll be seeing you.”





* [Sara Etgen-Baker] took a slightly different approach in trying to capture her mother’s wartime experiences. Sara says: “Many years prior to her death my mother returned to Liberal, Kansas, for her uncle’s funeral. I distinctly remember her telling me of her thoughts and feelings upon her arrival in Liberal, the Army Airfield, and her uncle’s house. I decided to let her become the narrator of her own story (as she told me); her voice seemed the most appropriate. My mother, Winifred C. Stainbrook married my father, Edwin R. Etgen on November 19, 1944. She was 19 and my father was 22.

Thanks Sara for sharing your mother’s story with us. –Matilda Butler

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Remembering Veterans Day

by kendra on November 11, 2014

Post #66 - Rosie’s Daughters: The “First Woman To” Generation Tells Its Story by Matilda Butler and Kendra Bonnett

From time to time, Bill Thomas shares a story with us. You may recall, from previous posts that prior to joining the military, Bill helped train women in the art of riveting during World War II. Today he would like to share some thoughts about Veteran’s Day and memories of a life spanning 90 years.

American Veterans Day

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Imagine…2014. It’s 100 years since 1914, and I’ve lived through 90 of those memorable years.

Why “memorable?” Lot’s of reasons come to mind.

One of the most memorable automobiles was Henry Ford’s “Model T” Ford (first produced in 1908). It was also the time when Ford doubled his workers’ daily wage to $5 per day.

July 12, 1914 was memorable because it was the day Serbian assassin Gavrilo Princip shot and killed the Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, as their motorcade passed through the streets of Sarajevo. While a lot of events contributed to the start of World War I, this is considered the triggering event.

America stayed neutral until 1917 when America became involved in that horrendous, bloody, and costly war. Almost 5 million young Americans served (about 3 million were draftees), and by the middle of 1918 the United States was sending 10,000 soldiers into France daily. American military casualties surpassed 100,000 and another 204,000 were the victims of severe wounds, scars, body losses, and impaired health.

Fortunately, many millions of our military warriors returned safely to the USA. All became known as VETERANS. My dad and uncle were two of them.

Happily, WWI ended when an Armistice was signed. And that memorable day–November 11, 1918–became known as Armistice Day and ultimately became Veterans Day. That day is commonly referred to as “the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month.”

Both wondrous and miserable days became memorable through the 1920s with the passage of Women’s Rights, the rise of radio and the silent movies, The Roaring 20’s, and the 1929 Wall Street Crash which brought on the Great Depression. The 1930s saw the introduction of the Social Security System and the most miserable era of the Dust Bowl in the mid-1930s.

Journalist Tom Brokaw’s book, The Greatest Generation, told the story (to quote Wikipedia) of “the generation who grew up in the United States during the deprivation of the Great Depression, and then went on to fight in World War II, as well as those whose productivity within the war’s home front made a decisive material contribution to the war effort, for which the generation is also termed the G.I.”

When WWII started, the United States stayed neutral but supplied war materiel to the Allies until that memorable “infamous” Sunday, December 7, 1941, when Japan launched a surprise, sneak-attack on Pearl Harbor. By the war’s end, our nation had lost more than 418,000 veterans and civilians. Worldwide the losses were astronomical. During and the months after the war, more 60 million people were killed worldwide, but with the support of our Allies, our American Veterans–including the meritorious effort and abilities of our women’s military organizations such as the WACS, WAVES, WASPS–liberated hundreds of millions of people whose countries had been defeated by the Axis.

Due to World War 2’s tremendous production requirements, the USA realized and enjoyed great economic gains and high labor employment–not seen since before the Great Depression. Millions of women were employed to help with the war effort in factories and offices. They became one of our country’s greatest assets. In 1942, I trained 40 “Rosie the Riveters.” However, their gainful employment also negated job opportunities to the returning military veterans.

After the war, many, if not most, of the women wanted to continue their precious employment. Anticipating the situation and to alleviate the veterans’ unemployment situation, President Roosevelt with the powerful voices of several veterans’ organizations, primarily the American Legion and the Veterans of Foreign Wars, helped Congress to pass the The Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944.

The law, commonly known as the G.I. Bill of Rights, also provided a wide range of educational assistance to service members, veterans, and their dependents. Many millions of male and female veterans flooded the country’s colleges and trade schools to improve and increase their future employment opportunities.

These newly educated and trained veterans became teachers, nurses, doctors, accountants, lawyers, bankers, secretaries, retail store, factory and office employees, managers, plumbers, mechanics, engineers, carpenters, painters, actors, etc. And their ability to enter the workforce led to greater national prosperity in the post-war years. Also with the assistance of the G.I. Bill, millions of new businesses, factories, and office buildings were constructed. And hundreds of thousands more veterans became farmers and ranchers.

Millions of people married, and many others needed housing, so millions of new houses and apartments were built. And those new residences needed furnishing, requiring the manufacture of all the new furniture and home furnishings. Millions of new automobiles and trucks were manufactured and sold as well.

The G.I. Bill was one of the greatest and most productive government assistance programs ever created. According to Congress’s Joint Economic Committee’s detailed cost analysis in 1988, Congress spent $51 billion (figured for 2006 dollars) of the People’s tax money on educational benefits alone. But the return on that expenditure created $260 billion in increased national productivity, and a RETURN INVESTMENT of tax dollars of $93 billion, which amounted to a gross profit of $353 billion. What that means, is that for $51 billion spent and $353 billion returned, the country returned $7 for every $1 spent.

Not only have our military veterans contributed their physical bodies, limbs and minds to protect and save our super-great nation, but have immensely added to the economic growth and prosperity of these great UNITED States of America.

Unfortunately, in recent years, too many people have switched the capital letter “I” in UNITED for the lower case “i” as in UNTiED. As true Americans, let’s all forget about Red states and Blue states. Let’s add the white back in and again become the red, white and blue UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. That’s the super-great nation we have worked for as civilians and died for as veterans ever since the Revolutionary War.

I intended to end this article by including a list of our local communities’ departed comrades who have “Reported to a Higher Command,” but the list would overflow this column. Instead, I hope you will join me as true patriots and take a bit of time to acknowledge and commemorate our military veterans this Tuesday, November 11, 2014. You can place an American Flag emblem on your lapel or collar, fly an American flag at your home or place of business, visit a cemetery, view a parade, or attend one of the Veterans Day ceremonies in your or nearby city.

Here in Southern California, one of the ceremonies closest to Seal Beach is the Veterans Day ceremony in Eisenhower Park near the Seal Beach Pier on Ocean Avenue, at the ocean-end of Main Street. This program will be conducted by and include members of American Legion Post 857 and Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4048. The “Young Marines” will also participate. The Program will include patriotic songs and a few, short speeches with Past Commander Dan Schmaltz serving as the Master of Ceremonies.

Bill Thomas is a Veteran of World War II and Past Commander of VFW Post 4048 and American Legion Post 857.

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Rosie Gets a Tattoo; You Can Do It…Too!

by kendra on October 9, 2014

Post #65 - Rosie’s Daughters: The “First Woman To” Generation Tells Its Story by Matilda Butler and Kendra Bonnett

Get your free Rosie the Riveter temporary tattoos while supplies last! Read on to find out how.

When we think about WWII and tattoos, this is what typically comes to mind:

But tattoos are not for men only…even in the 1940s…even in 1840s, for that matter. And especially these days when tattoos–permanent and temporary–are all the fashion.

And now Rosie the Riveter Legacy Gear has updated the tattoo look for 2014…with temporary tattoos that are fun, easy to apply, durable, and easy to remove. And all the inks are FDA-approved. Picture this. It’s our favorite, iconic, symbol of women’s strength, independence, and empowerment sporting her own tattoo:

Or this…Matilda showing off one of our new temporary tattoos. And because it’s temporary, she was all smiles during the application:

Matilda and I had fun sharing our tattoo designs with our Rosie alumnae…women who have purchased Rosie the Riveter Legacy Gear for Halloweens past. And then we received a fun reply from Wendy. She sent a photo of her own Rosie tattoo…the permanent kind…and invited us to share it with you. Here’s Wendy’s fabulous “empowered” arm:

Now, for a very limited time…

We’re offering a special opportunity for you to get your own “painless” temporary Rosie tattoos…in plenty of time to complete your Halloween costume. Visit our Etsy Rosie Legacy Gear shop and order any item, and you can save $5 and receive a pair of our exclusive Rosie tattoos as our gift. We’re including tattoos with every order, PLUS giving you $5 off any order. That includes our bandanas, Rosie employment badge collar pins, posters, DIY portrait and costume kits.

But we have a limited supply of tattoos, so act now. At Halloween, we ARE Rosie the Riveter Central, and our Rosie gear goes fast. Visit the store, and use coupon code ROSIE at checkout. You’ll see a line of blue text saying: “Apply shop coupon code.” Click on that and enter: ROSIE. Be sure to use ALL CAPS. You’ll save $5 and receive your free PAIR of Rosie tattoos.

And if you’re wondering whether or not WWII women with tattoos are historically accurate, check out this picture. There was a female tattoo artists in England who tatted up men and women both:

Halloween comes just once a year, and our tattoos won’t last long.

So order now, and have a Happy Halloween…on us!

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Rosie Stories: Semper Paratus - Always Ready by Diane Zelenakova

by Matilda Butler on October 1, 2014

Post #64 - Rosie’s Daughters: The “First Woman To” Generation Tells Its Story by Matilda Butler and Kendra Bonnett

We have a number of fantastic stories of women who helped America win World War II. Today, we are pleased to share with you the following history of Diane Zelanakova’s mother, Genevieve Zelenak. Diane has written this in her mother’s voice.

Semper Paratus – Always Ready: The Bug Bit Me and I Went

By Diane Zelenakova, with history and quotes from her trailblazing mother, Genevieve

My Mother, Genevieve Zelenak, at the Coast Guard Academy in New London, CT Summer 1943

My Mother at the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Summer 1943

As a Coast Guard officer, I was privy to information regarding a particular ship returning to San Francisco with prisoners of war from the Bataan Death March. My supervisor, the Assistant District Coast Guard Officer, asked me and another SPAR officer to go down to the pier, near our office, and greet these heroes. Members of the other women’s services were also there. For two hours we applauded, waved, and threw kisses to these brave men who were suffering from malnutrition, disease, and amputations. Some had canes or crutches and others were on stretchers – gaunt, emaciated, their skin yellow from malaria. Many of them returned our waves. On the way back to my office, I broke down and cried: this was the saddest experience of my service. The men were taken to Letterman Army General Hospital for R&R.

Upon our return to the office, the Captain asked us to attend a get-together that evening with some of the ambulatory officers at the Officers’ Club at the Fairmont Hotel, located across the street from my residence at the YWCA, to cheer them up and so they would not be alone their first night back. Each female officer was seated at a table with three men – at my table, they were from Oklahoma. They wanted to know what I was doing for the war effort, and I told them I got mail where it needed to go. They were proud of me that I was “helping out” and said they appreciated my efforts. Imagine – my efforts! It was hard for me to keep my composure, and after this encounter, I went home and again cried.

Years earlier, I had received a scholarship to the University of Michigan Ann Arbor, but had no money for room and board. I had originally wanted to become a nurse, but after graduation would have been too young to dispense medications because I skipped first grade and graduated high school at 17. I therefore attended Detroit Business University and received a Bachelor of Commercial Science degree, then got a job at Detroit Osteopathic Hospital in the radiology department, where I worked for three years. I was secretary to a Navy medical officer who gave SPARS their physical exams, so in that way was exposed to the idea of joining the military. The Coast Guard was under the Navy at that time, and my Navy boss referred to it as the “hooligan navy.” But I was a pacifist at heart, so that’s why I chose the Coast Guard – the Navy had guns, and I didn’t want to be around fighting.

In February 1943, when I had applied for acceptance to the Cadet program, the recruiting officer informed me that plans were being finalized for the SPAR (Semper Paratus – Always Ready) cadets to take their entire training at the Academy in New London, Connecticut, and she hoped that I would be accepted for that historic “first.” The officers in the WAC (Army), WAVES (Navy) and female Marines did not receive their training at West Point or Annapolis where male officer candidates were trained. At the time, the SPAR officers received their training with the WAVES at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts, with some spending their final week at the Academy.

At the time I entered the Coast Guard at age 23 on June 27, 1943, I became a member of the first Cadet Class to be trained and commissioned at a military academy – the New London, Connecticut U.S. Coast Guard Academy. Because of my college degree, I had been accepted into Officer Training School. I began training 25 years to the day after my father began Army training in WW I – he was so proud of me! One of my brothers joined the Marines, and the other the Army.

The SPAR cadets were quartered in a wing of Chase Hall, where a bulkhead had been built to separate us from the male cadets. The buildings were constructed in 1932 in the Georgian style of architecture. Some of the classes I took were Correspondence and Communications, Ships and Aircraft, Personnel, Organization and Duties, Law, History, and Public Speaking. We marched between classes, to mess, to the boat docks, and to perform calisthenics every Monday afternoon (after we had received our immunization shots) on the grounds of Connecticut College for Women located across the road. From the docks, we launched our crew boats and rowed up and down the Thames River. I recall the blisters we received on our hands hoisting the boats out of the water at the end of our twice-weekly cruises.

I was commissioned an Ensign on August 6, 1943. My orders directed me to proceed to the 12th Coast Guard District Office in San Francisco, where I was appointed the first Office Services Supervisor. I was one of the first two female officers assigned to that office.

Having never been west of Chicago, I had thought that California would have a lot of warm, sunny beaches. When I got to San Francisco, I was surprised at how windy and cold it was! But, being a city girl, I loved it – it had what I call “class.” For living quarters, the recruiting office referred me to the YWCA at 940 Powell Street (Chinatown). It cost $45 per month each for double occupancy, which included breakfast and supper. I initially had a roommate, but she got pregnant and left, so I then lived by myself and paid $60 per month.

We were required to be in uniform all the time, and I never felt like I was off-duty: it was a 24-hour job. We wore a hat and white gloves, and rayons (not nylons). We had a black coat and white scarf for cool weather. We wore a rain hat cover called a havelock whenever it rained, since we were not allowed to carry or use an umbrella; our right hand had to be free to salute, and our left had to remain at our side.

During the peak of the war effort I supervised one SPAR ensign, 14 enlisted SPARS and four Coast Guardsmen. I developed and maintained a system for the dispatch of all outgoing mail and for the receipt and distribution of all incoming mail in the district office. I also processed all office-related requisitions; kept a record of space allocations; was responsible for supervising the operation, repair and maintenance of office furniture and equipment; operated the supply storeroom; and developed plans for improving filing procedures. My work also involved assisting in problems with office procedures that arose in the various offices.

In 1944, approximately 30,000 letters were handled by the office. In addition, approximately 50,000 pieces, consisting of health records, pay records, service records, invoices, etc., were sorted, logged, and delivered. In 1945, the section handled more than 70,000 letters and 100,000 miscellaneous pieces. Distribution of publications was made weekly to 200 shore units and vessels.

SPARS campaigned for the bond effort and marched in parades to boost morale. I was appointed the drillmaster, and led the SPARS in every parade held in San Francisco and its environs. I also appeared in many publicity photos taken by the Public Relations Office for newspapers and recruitment articles.

Since I was fluent in a Slavic language (Slovakian, my father’s native tongue), right after my arrival in San Francisco, I was ordered to learn Russian. I read and interpreted communications when they arrived at the supply/communications office. When Russian ships came in, I read the manifest (cargo list). And when Russian men came by the ship, I had to be able to communicate with them. American men opened the cargo; I checked the contents against the manifest, and sometimes they did not match up. They tried to sneak stuff in. Here I was, a petite 5’2” woman, saying to huge Russian men, “Nyet! Nyet!”

It was just plain interesting: everything, everyone, every place! The experience taught me a lot about what I was capable of and who I was – I really grew as a person. I liked everything about the military: especially San Francisco. I really had a good time while I was there. There were many parties and dances, and sometimes I had four dates in one day – lunch, before-dinner cocktails, dinner, and then dancing.

At one point I was dating a Coast Guard officer assigned to our legal department. He suggested we stop at an officers’ club recommended to him by some friends. It was located in an out-of-the-way area on Russian Hill and we had to take a cab. The address was a huge mansion with no sign—suspicious! A woman about 55 years old, buxom, dressed in a long black dress, with a long string of pearls, opened the door. After looking at him, and then me, she said, “Oh, we have our OWN girls to entertain the boys!” and slammed the door. Bob and I laughed and laughed. Obviously, his friends had played a trick on him.

I was eventually assigned to conduct a Records Disposal Survey of the District files, which resulted in the disposition of 22,700 cubic feet of records. For this special achievement, I received a Letter of Commendation from L.T. Chalker, Acting Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard, dated September 8, 1944.

I was promoted to Lieutenant (j.g.) on November 1, 1944.

In late April 1945, my Captain supervisor phoned me and said he had two tickets to the Opening (Plenary) Session of the United Nations Conference on April 25 at the San Francisco Opera House. I was thrilled! Seated on stage were U.S. Secretary of State Edward R. Stettinius, Jr., Soviet Union Foreign Minister Vyacheslav M. Molotov, British Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden, Canadian Prime Minister Mackenzie King, Czech Foreign Minister Jan Masaryk, and South African Minister Jan Christiaan Smuts. Alger Hiss served as Secretary General of the conference, and serving on the U.S. delegation were Adlai E. Stevenson III and Ralph Bunche. The International Secretariat included Claiborne Pell, a young U.S. Coast Guard officer whose father had been the chief American diplomat in Lisbon during the war. During the afternoon recess I attended a matinee performance of Harriet (Beecher Stowe) starring Helen Hayes. After dinner at my residence I went to the Mark Hopkins Hotel, Top of the Mark – famous for its views – for socializing. I saw many foreign dignitaries with their ladies. Russian and Chinese men were in uniform and the Russian women wore low-necked, slinky black dresses and black silk stockings, with pearl necklaces. How I envied their black lacy hose!

V-J Day: August 15, 1945, San Francisco: Upon hearing the long-awaited good news about 4 p.m., we were dismissed and told to go home. En route, I stopped at Old St. Mary’s Church, which was filled with worshipers, to offer a prayer of thanksgiving. The streets of downtown San Francisco were filled with revelers.

On September 9, 1945, I was the commander of a company of 100 SPARS marching in a Victory Parade in San Francisco, from the Ferry Building to the Civic Center. The parade lasted almost four hours and was viewed by more than 500,000, according to a press release.

As my term of service drew to a close, I wanted to reenlist. However, I met an air force officer to whom I became engaged, and thus I was released to inactive duty on April 26, 1946. Decorations I received were the American Campaign Medal and the World War II Victory Medal.

In the 1990s, I donated two of my military uniforms – one to the U.S. Coast Guard Museum in New London, Connecticut, and another to the Women’s Military Museum in Washington, D.C.

I am proud and honored to have been a pioneer in breaking ground for women service personnel. To this day, I’m still glad I served in the military. If it hadn’t been for that experience, I honestly do not think I would be here today.

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Genevieve Zelenak died in 2009

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Diane, thank you for sharing this story of your mother.

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A Post-WWII Story of Love and Marriage

by Matilda Butler on September 26, 2014

Post #63 - Rosie’s Daughters: The “First Woman To” Generation Tells Its Story by Matilda Butler and Kendra Bonnett

Today, we celebrate a story from Bill Thomas, one of our Rosie fans. He’s previously shared information about training Rosie the Riveters and then a little about his military service during World War II. Recently, Bill sent me another story, told in third person, that brings us to the post-war years.

A MARRIAGE BEGAN…

In 1948, Bill and his pal, Perry, drove to New York to see the wondrous sights. Prior to leaving, Bill’s mother had given him the information about her aunt in New York.

At first, Bill was reluctant to call the aunt but he did; and she invited him to come to her home. There, also visiting from Durham, North Carolina, was Soula, a petite, beautiful brunette. The couple had three dates. Then each left to go homeward.

Bill and Perry drove casually across America taking in the sights enroute to California. They had a wonderful, but expensive nightclubbing time in Hollywood. They eventually went broke and had to stay in Los Angeles; so they sought and found suitable employment.

As the next three years passed, Bill, in Long Beach, California, and Soula in Durham, North Carolina, corresponded occasionally.

Just before Christmas in 1950, Bill phoned Soula and asked, “Hi, would you like some company for Christmas?”

Soula said, “Yes.” But she doubted if Bill would make the flight to Durham.

But make it he did. On Christmas Eve Bill proposed, “Let’s get married or something.”

Soula responded, “We’ll get married, or nothing.”

Bill flew back to California, contacted a manufacturing jeweler and ordered an engagement ring.
He mailed it to Soula.

Meanwhile Bill bought an unbuilt, three-bedroom house in Lakewood on the G.I. Bill.

In early May, the newly-married couple drove northward from Durham seeing famous sights along the east coast up to Niagara Falls and westward to his home-town of Detroit. After a short visit with Bill’s family and relatives, they drove to California in a new Cadillac.

They moved into their newly-built house.

After growing three children in Lakewood for ten years, the family moved to Rossmoor.

Now the kids have all grown up and become parents and homeowners themselves.

And our hero and heroine? Bill and Soula, both in their 90’s, have lived in their Rossmoor home for 53 years, and are now into their 63rd year of a happy marriage.

All this, after three dates. Who needs long engagements?

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Thanks Bill for such a touching love story. Congratulations on 63 years of marriage.

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Rosie Stories: My Mother’s Crimson Lipstick, Part 1 by Angela Kempe

by Matilda Butler on May 15, 2014

Post #62 - Rosie’s Daughters: The “First Woman To” Generation Tells Its Story by Matilda Butler and Kendra Bonnett

Stories of the Lives of Rosies, a Continuing Series

This website is devoted to stories of Rosie the Riveter and Rosies Daughters (and even granddaughters). We’ve received some wonderful vignettes and decided to issue a formal call for stories of Rosies. We got some great ones and will eventually put them into an ebook. But rather than wait until we can get that done (our list of projects is exciting but long), we are sharing them on this website and our WomensMemoirs website.

Today’s story is told in the voice of Angela Kempe’s beloved grandmother. We thought it would be fun to share the story between our two websites. So the first half is here and the second half is on our WomensMemoirs website.

If you started on this website, read the first half of the story here and then follow the link at the end for the remainder of the vignette.

Thank you Angela for sharing your grandmother’s story.

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My Mother’s Crimson Lipstick, Part 1

by Angela Kempe

I write this to honor my grandmother. She has told me many stories of her life over the years.

“I was thirteen,” she began, “when my family moved to Fortuna Mines, a tiny mining town chiseled out of the hot Arizona desert. A small group of tin shacks with wood paneling and giant windows on their sides were clustered near the mine as if a great hand had come down and swept away the dust of the desert there, uncovering something old and wonderful, like the bones of a precious fossil. And to me the place was wonderful and mysterious; it’s people, it’s lifestyle, and the memories that come to me like a beautiful mirage, rippling and glistening as they focus in and out of my mind after all these years.”

Over there stands my mother reigning over the desert, as beautiful as a rare flower. Maria Elena Acosta was a fashionable woman, full of complexities, subtle beauty, and poise. She always wore crimson lipstick, even while conducting the simplest of household tasks, like cooking tortillas on her wood stove with high heels clanking on the wood kitchen floor. The town had no refrigeration, so she kept her food fresh by placing wet gunny sacks over a wooden storage unit standing several feet off the ground at about waist high. And although life was harsh, she loved life at the mine as I did. She was deeply in love with my stepfather, Nick Barraza, a quiet man who never reprimanded us. He showed his love by spending long back-breaking hours working at the mine before emerging like a prairie dog from the desert with bronze skin, snow white hair, and a soft smile on his worn face.

My sister Laura and I were from my mother’s first marriage. Nick brought his son from a previous marriage. Nick and Maria together conceived my younger brother Frank and the youngest, my baby sister Elena.

Over the years, I came to realize that my mother’s heart only had room for one true love, a love she nurtured like a rare desert fruit and guarded with many thorns. She married four times, but it was for Nick that she coveted her affection, taking care of him even on his deathbed while her fourth husband stood by. And from the beginning, Nick must have seen those smooth crimson lips and brown eyes that gazed earnestly into his heart. He fell under her spell and worked hard to support her, even though it meant that we traveled from place to place as his jobs required us to move.

But she hid her affection for her children in a deep crevice between two tall desert cliffs, shearing into an abyss of darkness. In the light, she put her attention towards the chores, pronouncing that the house be as spotless as her delicate light complected skin. And we spent some part of each day dusting under every picture frame and statue, as if we, in our desire to please her were conveying a secret message of love in reply, speaking back to her through our obedience. And after all the work was done, she’d burn incense and lay down a sheet for all her children across the dirt floor in the main area of the house and lull us to sleep by doing a hula dance. I remember her smile finally opening up to us with her white teeth sparkling out of her red lips. And there was this desert flower, hips swaying from left to right and hair bouncing around her shoulders as my eyelids grew heavy.

My sister Laura, was one year older than I. She had a small build, but a large stance and she was my protector and dearest friend. We slept in a bunk bed together outside the front window, unaware of the threat of scorpions and other desert animals who ventured out from their rock shelters when the hot sun went down.

And our two Dutch bob haircuts bounced as we skipped through the neighborhood at my sister’s whim, running hand-in-hand. I was shy and asthmatic, but Laura was outspoken and strong.

My Mother’s Crimson Lipstick, Part 2 is continued here. Please join us for the conclusion of the story.

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Rosie Stories: Life in the Dormitory, Part 1 by Barbarann Ayars

by Matilda Butler on April 28, 2014

Post #61 - Rosie’s Daughters: The “First Woman To” Generation Tells Its Story by Matilda Butler and Kendra Bonnett

Stories of the Lives of Rosies

Kendra and I put out a call for stories of Rosies. We got some wonderful ones and will eventually put them into an ebook. But rather than wait until we can get that done (always more time consuming than we anticipate), we are sharing them on this website.

Today’s story is a bit unusual and so we decided to put half of it on our WomensMemoirs website and the other half here. Why? The author, Barbarann Ayars, has written this story from her perspective as a child. That makes it the memoir of a Rosie’s Daughter. At the same time, we learn a great deal about what life was like for her mother and many of the Rosies so it is a Rosie story.

If you started on this website, read the first half of the story here and then follow the link at the end for the remainder of the vignette. This is a fascinating story that rings true for many people whose parents found it difficult to provide for their family during The Depression and then had to figure out how to cope during the war, even though there was more money.

Thank you Barbarann for sharing this story.

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Life In the Dormitory: Getting There (Part 1)

by Barbarann Ayars

I stand in the foyer holding tightly to my little suitcase packed with a change of clothes, my nightgown, toothbrush, and slippers. I wait for Mama. This is my fourth birthday; she’s taking me to Elkton, Maryland where she lives and works. We’re taking the train! I can hardly stand still. I put down my suitcase, run to the window, climb onto the window seat and watch for her.

“Let’s go, Barbarann,” Mama calls as she enters the orphanage. I jump down from the window seat, so happy to see her. She reaches for my suitcase with one hand and stretches her other hand out to me.

I take her hand as we go outside to the taxi waiting to take us to the station. Mama smiles at my enthusiasm; I’ve never been on a train. We arrive in time to hear the train thundering into the station blowing steam and bell clanging. It makes the hair stand out on my neck. I climb right up her body as I shake with excitement and terror.

“Oh, get down! It’s okay; the train won’t eat you!” She pulls me off.

The engine is huge, a shiny black monster breathing hard as it paws the ground, waiting for me. Once it stops and the doors open, I scramble up the steps into its Pullman car and follow Mama down the aisle. She stops next to an empty row, lifts me up onto the seat next to the window, and puts my suitcase onto the shelf above my head. She places a small hamper beside it and sits down next to me.

“What’s in the hamper, Mama?” I didn’t even notice it before.

“We’ll be on the train until after dinner time,” she tells me. “Our lunch is in there.” She reaches to smooth my hair and retie the ribbon as she tells me there’s plenty to eat for later. I’m not hungry anyway. I’m too excited.

I stare out the window as the train moves forward with a lurch. I skooch closer, thrilled to have Mama all to myself. My siblings are still at the Home for the Friendless Children orphanage. This is my special time. The train picks up speed and the whistle blows loudly as our journey begins. I smooth my pinafore, pull up my frilly socks, and wipe the dust off my Mary Janes. It’s a hot August day, but I don’t care. I feel all grown up, with the pink bow in my yellow hair. Mama opens the window to let in a breeze.

“Don’t I look pretty, Mama?”

“You look very nice, Barbarann. All the girls will fall in love with you.”

She’s talking about the women she supervises. They had, she said, asked to see her little girl, so that’s why we’re on this trip. I don’t care why; I’m with my mother.

“They’ve seen a few pictures of you. They can’t believe your coloring is so different from mine.” She says this with a note of what seems like surprise.

Mama is very dark, with chocolate brown eyes and jet black, curly hair. She’s not petite, but solid and big boned. There’s none of her in me.

“I’m so happy to go away with you, Mama. Will there be lots of girls to take care of me while you work? Where will I sleep? Will there be someplace to play?”

I have so many questions but she says the usual “you’ll see when we get there” that is somehow soothing and normal. I settle into the rhythmic sway of the train and soon fall asleep, its whistle piercing my dreams.

The conductor comes by to punch our tickets as Mama wakes me for lunch. A peanut butter sandwich and a cookie accompanied by two tangerines and a banana make my meal. Mama thinks I’m too thin and always brings fruit when she visits, which isn’t very often. There’s nothing to drink, but it doesn’t matter. Having lunch alone with her is my treat.

It’s dark by the time we arrive at the dormitory and I’m half-asleep. She carries me inside and puts me down on her bed. There are many young women waiting for me; they fuss over me and cover me with kisses, calling me sweet, a little beauty, a tiny princess and other words that make me feel special. I smile a sleepy smile and my mother tucks me into her bed where I drop back to sleep until morning.

Click Here to Read — Life in the Dormitory: An Exciting Time (Part 2)

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Barbarann Ayars writes: “I live in a small town in Ohio where I work with writers as I shape my memoir. Writing at Writing It Real and Writers Digest has given me such wonderful exposure to the gifts of others. I can be found at Persimmon Tree and archived at Tiny Lights, Flash in the Pan and soon in another online magazine in June. Writing consumes unreasonable amounts of time and I’m not even sorry!”

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Rosie Goes to Washington (and Meets the President)

by Matilda Butler on April 3, 2014

Post #60 - Rosie’s Daughters: The “First Woman To” Generation Tells Its Story by Matilda Butler and Kendra Bonnett

If you are a fan of Rosie the Riveter (and you are since you are visiting this website), then you know about the Rosie the Riveter / WWII Home Front National Historical Park and the Rosie the Riveter Trust in Richmond, California. This week, they brought to fruition a long anticipated trip of Rosies to Washington, DC to meet Vice President Biden. While there, they had a surprise visitor (see the video below). We think you’ll love this modern day view of Rosies who helped us win World War II.

By the way, you just might want to have a handkerchief nearby. I know that I certainly teared up while watching the video.


ABC US News | ABC Business News

The Rosies who went to Washington are part of the Rosie the Riveter Trust. Here’s a little about it:

“In 1997, a group of Richmond citizens formed the Rosie the Riveter Memorial Committee to create a memorial that would honor the women who had worked on the home front during the war. The committee brought together a coalition of supporters to fund the creation of a permanent landscape sculpture and the City of Richmond sponsored an open design competition to select a design team. In October 2000, the Committee dedicated the sculpture in Marina Bay—a former Kaiser shipyard from World War II—with several hundred “Rosies” in attendance.

“Local leaders formed the Rosie the Riveter Trust, and worked with Congressman George Miller seeking Congressional authorization for a feasibility study to determine whether a national park could be established. Congressman Miller then carried legislation and President William Clinton signed the bill that established the Rosie the Riveter/Home Front National Historical Park on October 24, 2000.

“…Since the park’s formation, the Rosie the Riveter Trust and National Park service have worked to designate important historical sites, preserve and restore sites and artifacts, and create many more opportunities for visitor access and education about this catalytic and vitally important era in U.S. history.

“The Trust has been instrumental in helping to establish the Rosie the Riveter Memorial and park, in re-locating important artifacts like the huge Whirley Crane at Shipyard 3, and in completing a $9 million renovation of the historic Maritime Childcare Center, which won a LEED Gold for Schools award and now operates as a living part of the park. In May 2012, the Trust also supported the opening of of the new Visitor Center next to the Ford Assembly Plant, and a Visitor Gift Shop operated by the Trust. Other successes have included development of important youth programs like Rosie’s Girls, a free summer camp for at-risk girls, modeled on the courageous women who tackled hands-on jobs during WWII and in the process, broke barriers for women in the workforce.”

And of course, we are thrilled that most of the Rosies wore our Rosie the Riveter Legacy Bandana. Our Rosie Gear Product Line is now being sold by the Rosie the Riveter/Home Front National Historical Park in their store. If you are near Richmond or visit the Bay Area, be sure to stop by the museum and support their ongoing programs to honor the Rosie generation and future generations of Rosie Girls.

[If you are interested in any of our Rosie the Riveter Gear and won't be near Richmond, you will find description in our Rosie Store on this site. In addition, we now sell all of our items through our Etsy.com Store.]

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