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FAQ — Rosie’s Daughters

FAQ

Who are Rosie’s Daughters?

MB: We named our book to honor both the heroic and hardworking women who kept America going during World War II—and the women born during those war years. This figurative mother-daughter combination resulted in a fascinating generation of women who broke open the doors for the Baby Boomers.

What makes Rosie’s Daughters such a distinctive generation?

KB: Social, historical, political, technological and economic forces created a tsunami of national and, most importantly, personal change in the last six decades of the 20th century. Rosie’s Daughters, born between 1940 and 1945 were shaped by these momentous events at eventful moments in their lives. Post-war expanding higher education opportunities opened college doors to them. The Pill arrived just as they were marrying. Civil and gender rights legislation created new employment opportunities as they were finishing college. No-fault divorce laws enabled them to leave unsatisfactory marriages. And the list goes on.

What made a Rosie’s Daughter and a Boomer team up to write this book?

MB: As a woman born in the early years of WWII who grew up to be a social scientist, I found myself intrigued with how different my age-mates were from women just five years older and those five years younger.

KB:Who are Rosie’s Daughters?

MB: We named our book to honor both the heroic and hardworking women who kept America going during World War II—and the women born during those war years. This figurative mother-daughter combination resulted in a fascinating generation of women who broke open the doors for the Baby Boomers.

What makes Rosie’s Daughters such a distinctive generation?

KB: Social, historical, political, technological and economic forces created a tsunami of national and, most importantly, personal change in the last six decades of the 20th century. Rosie’s Daughters, born between 1940 and 1945 were shaped by these momentous events at eventful moments in their lives. Post-war expanding higher education opportunities opened college doors to them. The Pill arrived just as they were marrying. Civil and gender rights legislation created new employment opportunities as they were finishing college. No-fault divorce laws enabled them to leave unsatisfactory marriages. And the list goes on.

What made a Rosie’s Daughter and a Boomer team up to write this book?

MB: As a woman born in the early years of WWII who grew up to be a social scientist, I found myself intrigued with how different my age-mates were from women just five years older and those five years younger.

KB: As a Boomer Generation woman, I thought history was all about us. But when I became a historian, marketing entrepreneur, and writer, I saw how many of the women who had opened opportunities for all women were slightly older, born before the Boomers. Together, Matilda and I realized the importance of gathering and telling the stories of this ignored generation of women—stories that had never been told before. As a Boomer Generation woman, I thought history was all about us. But when I became a historian, marketing entrepreneur, and writer, I saw how many of the women who had opened opportunities for all women were slightly older, born before the Boomers. Together, Matilda and I realized the importance of gathering and telling the stories of this ignored generation of women—stories that had never been told before.


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Rosie the Riveter Bandana Rosie's Daughters: The 'First Woman To' Generation Tells its Story - RosiesDaughters.com